DHS to fund state, local pilots

Homeland Security Department officials seek proposals from state and local governments for small, innovative collaboration pilot projects, using $12 million approved by Congress as part of the department's fiscal 2004 budget.

The projects basically would be demonstrations of how leading-edge commercial technology can foster integration and collaboration between the many parts of government that work together for homeland security, said Steve Cooper, chief information officer at DHS.

"It can't be the same-old, same-old," Cooper said.

Department officials want to fund 12 to 24 projects, depending on "how much we can do before the money runs out," Cooper said today at a breakfast sponsored by Input in Arlington, Va.

Proposals must:

* Require less than $1 million in federal funding, since DHS is only providing "seed money," Cooper said.

* Deliver value, based on performance goals set by the pilot group, in three to six months.

* Connect more than one level of government and at least two sectors of the first responder arena.

DHS officials have been laying the groundwork for these regional pilots for more than a year, but now that they have approval from Congress, the money will be given out on a first-come, first-serve basis, Cooper said.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.