An IT defense

The Army has produced a six-page report recommending using technologies to fight roadside bombs in Iraq.

The report includes a three-page addendum chronicling incidents from March 1 through Sept. 1 and recommends five technologies that U.S. and coalition forces can use to more easily deal with the guerrilla threat.

The five technologies are:

Jammers: Electronic countermeasures that temporarily disable improvised explosive devices (IEDs) as vehicles drive by.

Thermal and vehicle-mounted mine-detection systems: Heat sensors that detect IEDs and vehicles operating on roads and roadsides that push rollers or plows to detonate mines.

Radio frequency devices: Communications signals that pre-detonate IEDs.

Armor: Armored high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles and the family of medium tactical vehicles.

Secret Internet Protocol Router Network: Classified computer installed in the Countermine Division building in the combat area to access current data on IEDs.

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