DISA awards GIG-BE contracts

The Defense Information Systems Agency has chosen the equipment providers for its Global Information Grid-Bandwidth Expansion (GIG-BE) project.

Science Applications International Corp., the prime contractor, awarded indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity subcontracts to Ciena Corp., Sprint Communications Co., Qwest Communications International Inc.'s Government Services Division and Juniper Networks Inc.

The new Defense Department network will enable warfighters and analysts to access and post intelligence information more quickly and easily than they do today. The worldwide network uses 10 gigabit/sec or faster connections. At the beginning, it will serve DOD users at 100 locations around the world.

Ciena will provide optical transport system equipment. Sprint will provide digital cross connect equipment, and Juniper will deploy IP routers. Qwest, with partner Cisco Systems Inc., will provide multiservice provisioning platform technology.

"We are extremely proud to have been selected for this global initiative and fully support DISA's vision for GIG-BE to make a transformational leap forward to create a secure, reliable enterprise IP infrastructure," said Scott Kriens, Juniper Networks' chairman and chief executive officer, in a statement.

"The importance and impact of this project cannot be overstated," he added, "and we undertake this assignment with full knowledge and companywide commitment to the goals of the government and recognize the significance of the faith that has been placed with Juniper Networks."

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