Dems see 'outdated' IT for homeland security

Democratic Report - "America at Risk: The State of Homeland Security"

House Democrats are charging that the Bush administration is moving too slowly and inadequately to close gaps in homeland security, including outdated and insufficient information technology applications and systems.

Democrats on the House Select Committee on Homeland Security released a 17-page report of initial findings today outlining security vulnerabilities in key areas, including intelligence, nuclear material stockpiles, aviation, borders, ports, critical infrastructure protection, privacy and civil rights, chemical plants, cybersecurity, bioterrorism, first responder preparedness, and information technology.

"We oftentimes have people ask us whether or not we're safer today than we were before Sept. 11, 2001 and there's no question we are safer," said Rep. Jim Turner (D-Texas), the ranking member on the committee. "But the issue is really not whether we're safer, the issue should be: Are we safe enough? And I think it's clear

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