White House would cut State IT funds

In a year of great budget restraint, President Bush's fiscal 2005 budget would parcel out $831 million for the State Department's information technology spending, a drop of $48 million from 2004.

Most programs would remain static, but several global integration systems would see cuts if Congress passes Bush's request. Among them:

* The Global Financial Management system to integrate overseas and domestic financial management into one worldwide system would decline from $15.8 million in 2004 to $9.2 million in fiscal 2005.

* Funding for e-mail operations would fall from $10.3 million in fiscal 2004 to $7.4 million in fiscal 2005. The program provides round-the-clock support for e-mail and telegram messaging systems, firewalls, and secure domestic dial-in capabilities.

* Money for State Messaging and Archival Retrieval Toolset to position the department to provide secure electronic connectivity with the foreign affairs community would drop from $38.7 million in fiscal 2004 to $32.5 million in fiscal 2005.

However, one big-ticket operation, Global IT Modernization, got a huge boost from $284 million in fiscal 2004 to $313.7 million proposed for fiscal 2005 for centrally managed modernization that would maintain the department's office automation and support its server infrastructure.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.