Qwest to build network for NASA lab

Qwest Communications International Inc. won a contract to provide a high-speed optical network to three research facilities in West Virginia, including NASA's Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) facility in Fairmont, W.Va.

Qwest officials described the five-year contract as in the multimillion-dollar range, but did not specify the value. The OC-12 synchronous optical network will link the NASA facility with the West Virginia University Research Corp. and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, both in Morgantown.

The network also enables connectivity to the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center terascale computer and other research organizations nationwide. Under the contract, Qwest is providing equipment, construction and network management. Local service in West Virginia is provided by Allegheny Energy Inc.'s Allegheny Communications Connect. "Qwest worked with each to build the network on site, keeping cost to the customer as low as possible," said James Payne, senior vice president of the company's Government Services Division. The new architecture allows for expanded bandwidth to all the connected facilities, and additional users can be connected later, said Ned Keeler, director of NASA's IV&V facility, which took the lead in developing the network upgrade.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.