Fed architecture enters next phase

Federal Enterprise Architecture Program Management Office

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Office of Management and Budget officials have started the next step toward allowing agencies to share and access information about the components of the federal enterprise architecture.

The federal enterprise architecture program management office has launched a user group as Phase II of a pilot program in the development of the federal enterprise architecture management system (FEAMS). The user group, which has its first meeting Feb. 12, will involve agencies to provide feedback on how FEAMS can provide online access to agencies' architecture initiatives and the five reference models.

By providing a repository to store common components across the government, the FEAMS allows users to leverage cross-agency initiatives and services. The system includes all agencies' Exhibit 300s -- the business cases that OMB requires for all major information technology acquisitions -- and the business, service component and technical reference models, according to the program management office.

Version 0.1 of the FEAMS was released as a pilot to the Agriculture and Labor departments, General Services Administration and Environmental Protection Agency to test overall usability. The pilot was then extended to include the Interior, Housing and Urban Development, and Health and Human Services departments, the OMB, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Social Security Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to test and evaluate the system's functionality, according to program management office officials.

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