What's in a name?

The National Imagery and Mapping Agency officially became the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) last November, when the Defense Authorization bill was signed.

Although the new title is four words long, the agency will officially use a three-letter acronym. This is by design, according to NGA officials, who feel that the new title more accurately reflects the agency's true mission, which is to provide intelligence and analysis rather than simply reproducing maps and imagery.

Having a three-letter acronym is also important because it affords the same recognition level as other major players in the intelligence community, such as the CIA, FBI, National Security Agency and Homeland Security Department.

Although the agency's name change may initially result in less recognition, NGA customers can expect to receive the same product.

"Our core business is the geospatial analysis that we can provide homeland security customers," said Joe Drummey, deputy director of NGA's Office of the Americas.

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