What's in a name?

The National Imagery and Mapping Agency officially became the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) last November, when the Defense Authorization bill was signed.

Although the new title is four words long, the agency will officially use a three-letter acronym. This is by design, according to NGA officials, who feel that the new title more accurately reflects the agency's true mission, which is to provide intelligence and analysis rather than simply reproducing maps and imagery.

Having a three-letter acronym is also important because it affords the same recognition level as other major players in the intelligence community, such as the CIA, FBI, National Security Agency and Homeland Security Department.

Although the agency's name change may initially result in less recognition, NGA customers can expect to receive the same product.

"Our core business is the geospatial analysis that we can provide homeland security customers," said Joe Drummey, deputy director of NGA's Office of the Americas.

Featured

  • Telecommunications
    Stock photo ID: 658810513 By asharkyu

    GSA extends EIS deadline to 2023

    Agencies are getting up to three more years on existing telecom contracts before having to shift to the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions vehicle.

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image ID: 569172169 By Zenzen

    OMB looks to retrain feds to fill cyber needs

    The federal government is taking steps to fill high-demand, skills-gap positions in tech by retraining employees already working within agencies without a cyber or IT background.

  • Acquisition
    GSA Headquarters (Photo by Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

    GSA to consolidate multiple award schedules

    The General Services Administration plans to consolidate dozens of its buying schedules across product areas including IT and services to reduce duplication.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.