Customs delays air manifest requirement

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Thursday announced a five-month delay for requiring air cargo shippers to electronically send their cargo manifests to border officials before the imported goods arrive in the United States. This is one of several moves to tighten security and prevent terrorism from occurring on U.S. shores.

Although air shippers were supposed to begin complying with the new regulations on March 4, CBP Commissioner Robert Bonner said the delay was necessary to train officers to handle the data and certify the software being used by shippers.

The manifest rule is similar to one being implemented for container cargo shippers. Air shipping requirements also will be implemented beginning in August, first at East Coast facilities and on the West Coast by the end of 2004. Bonner said air shippers who are ready to proceed before the deadline would be allowed to phase in with their electronic manifest systems.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.