Military deploys IT task force

The military today announced it fielded to Pacific Command and Southern Command a new command and control unit that specializes in information technology.

Joint Forces Command officials by October plan also to deploy the Standing Joint Task Force Headquarters to European Command and Northern Command and in fiscal 2005 to the remaining unified combatant commands, said a March 11 Command statement.

"Using tools such as the collaborative information environment, a Joint Task Force headquarters using the enabling capabilities of the Standing Joint Task Force Headquarters can get all the relevant planning and operating information on the table much faster, thus decreasing its planning and recommendation cycle, so commanders can make decisions faster than we've seen in the past," said Navy Rear Adm. Richard O'Hanlon, who oversees the unit's development and implementation efforts, in the statement.

The Standing Joint Task Force Headquarters consists of 58 people specializing in operations, planning and information management. The group will decrease warfighting-planning efforts from days and weeks to hours and a couple days, the statement said.

Joint Forces Command officials during the past five years studied the streamlined headquarters. The command, located in Norfolk, Va., in 2002 moved it from concept to design, but it fell six months behind schedule.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    malware detection (Alexander Yakimov/Shutterstock.com)

    Microsoft targets copycat influence websites

    Microsoft went to court to take down websites it believes to be part of a foreign intelligence operation targeting conservative think tanks and the U.S. Senate.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network

    FAA explores shifting its network to FISMA high

    The Federal Aviation Administration is exploring an upgrade to the information security categorization of IT systems as part of air traffic control modernization.

  • Cybersecurity
    Shutterstock photo id 669226093 By Gorodenkoff

    The disinformation game

    The federal government is poised to bring new tools and strategies to bear in the fight against foreign-backed online disinformation campaigns, but how and when they choose to act could have ramifications on the U.S. political ecosystem.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.