DIA aims for easily managed info

The Defense Intelligence Agency's planned updates in information technology during the next six years will pale in comparison to those made from the first Persian Gulf War to Operation Iraq Freedom, a top DIA official said today.

The agency wants to persistently and intrusively target enemy forces. It also needs to easily manage and share information collected on them, said Louis Andre, DIA's chief operating officer, speaking at a luncheon sponsored by the Northern Virginia chapter of AFCEA International.

During the 1991 Gulf War, DIA officials did not possess the intelligence network and video-teleconferencing capabilities available during last year's Iraqi invasion. "We have a clear idea where we need to take defense intelligence," Andre said.

That means big business for vendors that can provide IT equipment and services that let DIA personnel and systems quickly find, share and process data. The agency especially wants content-tagging technologies, he said

"DIA wants to put information into a form where it can be easily managed," Andre said.

The new Defense Intelligence Information Systems Integration and Engineering Support Services 3 contract may provide DIA with some of the hardware and software. The agency awarded contracts to seven vendors in December.

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