Comings and goings

S.W. "Woody" Hall, who spent 30 years in the federal government, most recently as chief information officer of the Homeland Security Department's Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, has joined Science Applications International Corp. as a corporate vice president for homeland security.

The job comes with a hitch, though: He has a one-year ban on doing business with the Homeland Security Department. "For the time being, I am a utility player," Hall said in a recent e-mail. "I help where I am needed." He expects to focus on homeland security initiatives and "take on more of a management role" when the ban is lifted.

Robert Lohfeld, who has held high-level positions with OAO Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. in recent years, has begun his own business,

Lohfeld Consulting Group, to advise government contractors on bidding, mergers and acquisitions and in other business areas.

James O'Neill was named president of Northrop Grumman Corp.'s $4.8 billion information technology sector.

Rob White, who most recently worked for Rep. Jo Ann Davis (R-Va.) on the House Civil Service Subcommittee, joins the staff of Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.) and the House Government Reform Committee to handle communications.

Mark Moore was named executive vice president and chief operating officer of Segovia Inc., a provider of secure global voice, data and video broadband satellite services.

Brian Hays, a former senior vice president at SAIC, was named chief executive officer and chairman of SiteScape Inc., a provider of secure Web-based enterprise collaboration technologies.

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