E-file nears 50 million returns as April 15 deadline approaches

E-file nears 50 million returns as April 15 deadline approaches

Heading into the last weekend before the April 15 deadline, taxpayers submitting their returns to the IRS electronically remain on pace to break last year’s record of 53 million e-filings.

Taxpayers have e-filed 48.5 million returns—60 percent of all returns—as of April 2, 12 percent ahead of last year.

“To avoid last-minute tax headaches, we urge people to use e-file,” said IRS commissioner Mark Everson in his weekly drumbeat for e-filing. “E-filing is the fastest, easiest way to do taxes. There are fewer errors, and taxpayers get their refunds in less than half the time of paper returns.”

Home computer filers have submitted more than 11 million returns, 21.3 percent more than last year. Tax professionals filed more than 34.2 million returns electronically, a 13.7 percent increase. The Free File program topped 2.7 million returns, up 23 percent. Taxpayers can access Free File by visiting IRS.gov to determine eligibility.

More than 16.8 million people have accessed the “Where’s My Refund?” feature at IRS.gov to check the status of their refunds. Taxpayers who file electronically can use the service within 72 hours of submitting returns. Paper filers can use “Where’s My Refund?” three to four weeks after mailing their returns.

Taxpayers who need more time to complete their forms may file for an automatic four-month extension by phone or computer as well as through paper Form 4868. Users may also e-file an extension request using tax preparation software on their own computers or through the services of a tax preparer.

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