JLT debuts ruggedized tablet

The 3.52-pound G-Force 850 ruggedized tablet PC is JLT Mobile Computers Inc.'s first foray into the ruggedized tablet PC space.

The tablet qualifies for protection class IP-65, which means it is protected from dust and low-pressure water jets. With its fold-back cover in place, it can withstand total water immersion or firehose-strength spraying, according to JLT officials. It can also sustain a three-foot drop onto concrete with the cover open.

Operating temperatures range from -5 degrees Celsius to 45 degrees Celsius, and acceptable storage temperatures range from -10 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius.

The G-Force 850 features an 800 x 600 8.4-inch touch screen display that automatically brightens for viewing in direct sunlight and backlights for nighttime use.

The unit does not come with integrated wireless connectivity, but the PC Card slot supports all forms of wireless and radio modem communications. It also features USB, Firewire and PS/2 ports.

Number crunchers will be happy to learn that JLT also offers a version of the tablet with a keypad.

The tablet is powered by a 800 MHz Transmeta Crusoe TM 5400 processor and comes with 256M of memory. Two CF type II card slots each support 256M of flash memory. One is for Microsoft Corp. Windows XP use and the other, which can be swapped with a 1G or 2G — and the soon-to-be-released 5G — micro drive, is for user applications.

A second G-Force model, available later this year, will offer a 10.4-inch display.

The G-Force 850 starts with a list price of $4,000.

For more information, visit www.jltmobilecomputers.com/gforce850.htm.

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