Input: Virginia leads in IT

Input report

Related Links

The state of Virginia exemplifies the future of state and local information technology consolidation and practices, officials from the market research firm Input say.

Every state is looking for methods and policies that will allow them to conserve funds and still serve their employees and citizens. IT consolidation appears to be the inevitable trend, and Virginia is far out in the front of the pack, thanks to programs that officials began as far back as 2001, according an Input report released this week.

"As many states are beginning to slowly recover from fiscal crisis and determine where to cut their overhead, Virginia has been implementing best-of-breed IT practices to optimize technology functions across the state," said Marcus Fedeli, manager of state and local opportunity products at Input.

The full organizational consolidation effort within the state culminated with two new laws in 2003 that dissolved several existing IT-related organizations and created a single Virginia Information Technology Agency. The change will still take the rest of this year, gradually bringing all of the existing organizations together from the smallest to the largest, and will affect 92 agencies across the state.

Virginia officials are also seeing significant savings from their electronic commerce initiative, the centralized eVA procurement Web site that officials launched in 2001, and they are now beginning to see what savings can be gained through reverse auctions under the eVA portal.

"Many states are closely observing the strategies and policies utilized by Virginia for success so that they may also apply similar techniques," according to the report. "While e-procurement needs no proof of legitimacy, [Virginia's] foray into alternative funding strategies, IT consolidation and best-in-business goals provide a great example for state and local governments."

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.