Northrop wins support deal

Defense Department officials today announced they have awarded an analytical support contract to Northrop Grumman Corp. worth as much as $220 million over five years.

The joint analytical support deal is an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract and calls for Northrop to provide on-site analytical support to the Joint Staff and combatant commands.

Northrop Grumman currently provides joint analytical support with 12 major military command sites as well as the Joint Staff site in the Pentagon. Northrop Grumman has approximately 120 employees and 25 subcontractors working at these sites, and anticipates adding 50 employees on this follow-on contract, company officials announced.

As part of this follow-on contract, Northrop Grumman's Information Technology sector will also provide analytical support services to the Army Training and Doctrine Command (Tradoc) Analysis Center, at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The support includes operations research and systems analysis support, systems engineering analysis and implementation, modeling and simulation development, wargaming and defense issues analysis, data-mining support, and local-area network design and implementation.

Subcontractors on the IT contract include AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., CACI Inc., Perot Systems Corp. and Science Applications International Corp.

Northrop's Mission Systems sector supports the current joint analytical support program at Strategic Command in Omaha, Neb. The sector offers operational analysis, modeling and simulation, systems analysis support, and systems engineering analysis and implementation.

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