U.S. enemies in cyberspace

Terrorist organizations and individuals attempting to break into networked computers are likely to attack military networks, according to reports published by the Congressional Research Service.

"Every time the political climate gets hot, individuals decide to send a message," said Clay Wilson, a specialist in technology and national security in the CRS' Foreign Affairs, Defense and Trade Division.

In a report released last October, "Computer Attack and Terrorism: Vulnerabilities and Policy Issues for Congress," Wilson said the terrorist organization al Qaeda may resort to cyberwarfare.

"Seized computers belonging to al Qaeda indicate its members are now becoming familiar with hacker tools that are freely available over the Internet," said Wilson, who researches computer network attack and defense for Congress.

Wilson's colleague Steven Hildreth wrote in his 2001 report, "Cyberwarfare," that the People's Republic of China may someday use and write software to attack foes.

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