Appliances tackle security issues

Openness ranks among the top advantages of Web services technology.

Indeed, Web services let organizations readily share information with business partners. But a security breach can undercut that benefit, especially if a Web service exposes data to unauthorized parties. Vendors selling Extensible Markup Language security appliances aim to fill the security gap, and government agencies are taking notice.

The Federal Trade Commission, for example, uses Westbridge Technology's XA2500 appliance to secure its Web services, which includes the National Do Not Call Registry. The product supports authentication, access control, encryption, decryption, signing and signature verification among other

capabilities, according to Westbridge officials.

There is a downside to improved protection: Web services can take a performance hit when

security contributes to processing overhead. Vendors are incorporating acceleration features to

address this security-vs.-performance trade-off.

Featured

  • People
    Federal CIO Suzette Kent

    Federal CIO Kent to exit in July

    During her tenure, Suzette Kent pushed on policies including Trusted Internet Connection, identity management and the creation of the Chief Data Officers Council

  • Defense
    Essye Miller, Director at Defense Information Management, speaks during the Breaking the Gender Barrier panel at the Air Space, Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., Sept. 19, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Chad Trujillo)

    Essye Miller: The exit interview

    Essye Miller, DOD's outgoing principal deputy CIO, talks about COVID, the state of the tech workforce and the hard conversations DOD has to have to prepare personnel for the future.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.