Appliances tackle security issues

Openness ranks among the top advantages of Web services technology.

Indeed, Web services let organizations readily share information with business partners. But a security breach can undercut that benefit, especially if a Web service exposes data to unauthorized parties. Vendors selling Extensible Markup Language security appliances aim to fill the security gap, and government agencies are taking notice.

The Federal Trade Commission, for example, uses Westbridge Technology's XA2500 appliance to secure its Web services, which includes the National Do Not Call Registry. The product supports authentication, access control, encryption, decryption, signing and signature verification among other

capabilities, according to Westbridge officials.

There is a downside to improved protection: Web services can take a performance hit when

security contributes to processing overhead. Vendors are incorporating acceleration features to

address this security-vs.-performance trade-off.

Featured

  • Management
    people standing on keyboard (Who is Danny/Shutterstock.com)

    OPM-GSA merger plan detailed in legislative proposal

    The White House is proposing legislation for a dramatic overhaul of human resources inside government and wants $50 million to execute the plan.

  • Cloud
    cloud applications (chanpipat/Shutterstock.com)

    GSA plans civilian DEOS counterpart

    GSA is developing a cloud email and enterprise services contract inspired by the single-source vehicle the Department of Defense devised for back-office software.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    DOD looks to unify software spending for 2020

    Defense Department acquisition head, Ellen Lord, hopes to simplify software buying and improve business systems following the release of the Defense Innovation Board's final software acquisition study.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.