Coming in June: E-gov plan

FY 2003 E-Government Strategy (PDF)

Office of Management and Budget officials expect to release the latest E-Government Strategy at the beginning of June, several months later than planned, in order to provide a preview instead of a review.

In the past, the strategy has served as a checkup on the status of the e-government initiatives that are the centerpiece of the strategy, said Karen Evans, administrator for e-government and information technology at OMB.

This year, "my viewpoint is that we've already done all that reporting" she said. Much of the information is included in the fiscal 2005 budget proposal, and even more detail is provided in OMB's first report to Congress on implementation of the E-Government Act. Officials submitted that report in March.

"So this strategy is really the forward look," Evans said. "We're trying to set the new strategy."

To do this, OMB officials decided to delay releasing the strategy in April in order to gather input from the agency and industry leaders themselves at the Management of Change conference being held this week in Philadelphia. The CIO Council has already held its off-site meeting there, and by adding the ideas for future "breakthrough performance" gathered at the conference, OMB officials will have a strategy that does more than rehash existing information, Evans said.

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