Safecom chief defends program

"Key Cross-Agency Emergency Communications Effort Requires Stronger Collaboration"

The leader of the federal government's wireless interoperability program said a recent General Accounting Office report criticizing its progress was completed before many program accomplishments were completed.

The GAO report, issued in April, said that Safecom made little progress in its two years of existence largely because of lacks of high-level executive support, formal interagency agreements and nonfederal stakeholders.

"The GAO report reflects only a little bit of what we've managed to accomplish so far and that's largely because...it finished up really before the bulk of the things we put together have been done," said David Boyd, Safecom program manager.

In a recent interview with Federal Computer Week, Boyd listed a number of accomplishments of the program office since last June — most of which occurred this year. They include:

Support from the first responder community, especially at the state and local levels because they own, operate, and maintain more than 90 percent of the public safety wireless communications infrastructure.

A joint statement of Safecom support from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, U.S. Conference of Mayors, National League of Cities, Association of Public Safety Communications Officials and other major law enforcement and emergency management organizations.

Collection of information on 60 programs about interoperability in a catalog available on the Internet

A common grant guidance, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Community Oriented Policing Services Office began using last year, for the different federal interoperability funds available.

Production of the first national statement of requirements to help steer the industry to develop what's needed among public safety communities and to serve as a planning document for state and local officials. "We had had several companies come in now and show us how they're mapping those requirements to the capabilities they provide so it's doing the kind of thing we want it to do," Boyd said.

Creation of a federal interoperability coordination council, which brings together every federal activity that relates to interoperability, whether it's providing grants or building a system. Standards-making and regulatory organizations, such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Federal Communications Commission, are also part of the council.

"Safecom, of course, establishes the national architecture, coordinates the federal activity, and manages the standards piece," Boyd said. "That's what it was charged to do, and it continues to do that, and so all the communications elements of this office will be in compliance with those things."

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.