MIDAS to model unwelcome touch

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Bugs in the system

The four grants that the National Institute of General Medical Sciences awarded in May for the institute's Models of Infectious Disease Agents Study program, worth up to $28 million during five years, will support:

A collaboration of scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Brookings Institution, NASA, the University of Maryland and the Imperial College in London to create highly visual, user-friendly computational analyses of disease outbreaks.

A study at Los Alamos National Laboratory to explore the spread and possible containment of multiple, interacting, disease-causing organisms in hypothetical urban areas with a population of 1.5 million or more.

A model at Emory University of a disease outbreak in hypothetical American communities with populations of 2,000 to 48,000 people.

An informatics group — led by Research Triangle Institute International in North Carolina and including SAS Institute Inc., IBM Corp., Emory and Duke universities — to design a wide array of computational and analytical tools to model emerging infectious diseases and public health responses.

Source: National Institute of General Medical Sciences

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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