Using technology to protect privacy

Data mining raises fears about the loss of privacy. But officials at the Center for Democracy and Technology have identified three approaches to designing data-mining projects that can protect personal information held in government and commercial databases. They are:

Make databases anonymous by encrypting first and last names to prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful disclosure of personal information.

Build permission rules into the databases and database queries to control access to personal information.

Use the databases to create audit trails that cannot be altered by someone trying to hide evidence of privacy abuses.

Source: Center for Democracy and Technology

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.