Johns Hopkins leads in cyber education

Johns Hopkins University is a model for colleges and universities nationwide in the area of cybersecurity and information technology education.

In addition to integrating information security education and research into the curricula of every school in the university, officials have created the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute.

Through the institute, Hopkins offers a master of science degree in security informatics taught by professors from the university's schools of engineering, arts and sciences, public health, advanced international studies, and professional studies in business and education.

University officials are in the process of developing joint programs with several Washington, D.C., and Baltimore area community colleges, said John Baker, director of technology programs for the Division of Undergraduate Education of the School of Professional Studies in Business and Education at Hopkins.

"These would provide students at two-year institutions with complete academic program opportunities at the bachelor's level -- and extending into the master's level," he said.

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