Northrop wins $71M Army deal

Northrop Grumman Corp. received a five-year, $71 million task order for continued information technology support services as part of the Army's Systems and Software Engineering Support Services program.

The company's IT business unit in Herndon, Va., will provide acquisition and software support for the Software Engineering Center at the service's Communications-Electronics Command (Cecom) in Fort Monmouth, N.J., according to a statement released today.

Northrop Grumman and its industry team of vendors will perform program management, engineering security, logistics and technical support. The task order also covers interoperability analysis and testing, system design and configuration, modeling, and simulation, according to the statement.

In 2001, Cecom IT officials awarded a 10-year contract worth up to $1.45 billion to industry teams led by Northrop Grumman and Itel Solutions to support critical software programs. The deal broke with the command's previous support services contracts.

The two contractors compete on projects across various domains, such as command, control, communications and intelligence, electronic warfare, sensors, and avionics. In the past, the Army awarded contracts for each domain individually.


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