OMB finds e-gov exec

Office of Management and Budget officials promoted from within today to fill the vacant position of associate administrator of e-government and information technology.

Timothy Young, one of four e-government portfolio managers, will fill the position, which has been empty for approximately six weeks since previous associate administrator Tad Anderson left government to join Dutko Government Markets, a consulting group.

Young joined the OMB 11 months ago as head the Internal Effectiveness and Efficiency portfolio, which manages seven of 24 e-government initiatives. The objectives of the portfolio are to rethink internal government processes and include e-Training, e-Travel, e-Records and e-Payroll, among others.

Karen Evans, who now becomes Young's immediate superior, called him "an excellent selection for this position."

Young understands the environment and has experience working with key stakeholders, Anderson said.

"Going into the budget cycle, heading into a political year, there's going to be a lot of other competing priorities going on," Anderson said. "He's going to have a lot of balls in the air."

Prior to joining OMB, Young was a senior consultant at BearingPoint Inc. of McLean, Va., where he worked on improving business processes and service reengineering.

Young holds a master's degree in business administration from American University, where he concentrated in management of global information technology. He also conducted research internships in Congress and the Heritage Foundation.

About the Author

David Perera is a special contributor to Defense Systems.

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