Risky business

As the six case studies in this special report show, homeland security-related information technology projects come in many shapes and sizes. There are regional emergency alert networks, first responder communication systems, federal data-mining programs, law enforcement data-sharing systems and many more. The systems can involve one agency or multiple ones, focus on a single discipline or span several, and

use technologies that range from conventional to cutting-edge.

It is also true that not every IT project is a success, a fact often abundantly clear given the high visibility of most government programs and the extra scrutiny a nervous nation directs to homeland security initiatives in particular.

So what are the factors that determine whether a project succeeds or fails, and what are the best ways to manage those risks? The purpose of this special report is to address those questions by taking a closer look at the lessons learned in a handful of projects.

Featured

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    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

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