DigitalNet hires TSA exec

One of this year's Federal 100 winners will leave his government job to take an industry job.

Michael Przepiora, the director of solutions delivery for the Transportation Security Administration, is leaving at the end of September to become a vice president at DigitalNet Inc.

"Michael is a proven and highly skilled enterprise director with experience at the personal and technical level to help lead our growth and expansion in the organization," said Mitchell Rambler, DigitalNet's senior vice president of military programs and a friend of Przepiora.

Przepiora joins a number of officials who have left the government for DigitalNet Inc., including Debra Stouffer, former chief technology officer at the Environmental Protection Agency; William McVay, former deputy branch chief of the Office of Management and Budget's Information Policy and Technology Branch; and Norm Lorentz, former OMB chief technology officer.

A former Marine who has also worked in the Peace Corps, Przepiora won a 2004 Federal 100 award. He led the development of daily operating procedures related to TSA's Information Technology Managed Services contract.

He holds a master's degree in contract management. Przepiora also spent five years with the Naval Air Systems Command.

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