Northrop competes for DOT protection

The Transportation Department's Volpe National Transportation Systems Center added Northrop Grumman Corp. to the list of companies eligible for up to $120 million in work to protect Transportation Department buildings, security systems and employees from terrorism.

"Northrop Grumman's experience providing physical security services to government agencies helps us fully understand the scope of the Volpe Center's requirements," said Sidney Fuchs, president, Northrop Grumman Information Technology's TASC business unit. "We will use our security knowledge and capabilities to further support the government in its mission to combat terrorism and upgrade the security and electronic systems of our nation's infrastructures."

Under the scope of the contract, Northrop Grumman's IT unit will compete to protect several modes of transportation, logistics processes and governmental functions, facilities and operations from sabotage and terrorist attacks. Northrop Grumman will also provide services including vulnerability assessments and security planning, security-system design and installation, and support for contingency and emergency response and recovery.

Other companies competing for the Volpe task orders include: Batell, Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., Johnson Controls Inc., Lockheed Martin Corp., Science Applications International Corp., JRS Group, Unisys Corp. and STG International Ltd.

The Northrop Grumman IT team includes: Daniel, Mann, Johnson, Mendenhall, Holmes and Narver Inc.; Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas Inc.; Excalibur Associates Inc.; Flatter and Associates Inc.; Spectrum Security Group Inc.; and Siemens Building Technologies.

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