Four IT bills rejected in California

Schwarzenegger bill signings and vetoes

Two measures to restrict outsourcing were killed by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's veto pen Sept. 29.

Schwarzenegger vetoed 31 bills and signed 52 into law. Four of those vetoed address technology-related issues that are playing out across the country, including outsourcing, broadband access and electronic surveillance of employees.

Overseas outsourcing — also known as offshoring — and outsourcing of homeland security work are among the most contested issues in the information technology community. Bills to restrict or ban such outsourcing are under discussion in more than half of the states.

In sending the two outsourcing bills back to the State Assembly and State Senate, administration officials cited the impact on businesses, California's place in the global market, the need for true security measures and the effect on costs to government.

"In today's global economy, the best approach to create and enhance job growth in California is to provide a competitive business environment," Schwarzenegger wrote in a letter to the assembly. "In order to improve their competitiveness in a global market, California businesses cannot be penalized with punitive policies restricting their ability to make decisions on how to best perform and provide goods or services for state government and our consumers."

He also said that a bill that would require employers to provide notice of electronic monitoring of Internet use and e-mail is too broad and would place "an unfair and unrealistic burden on those employers wishing to monitor the electronic activity of their workers."

The proposal to expand broadband access would have the state promote communications services, including phone and cable options, to residents. Schwarzenegger rejected it as incomplete and called on the legislature to work with him to develop a comprehensive plan.

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