Grants.gov marks first anniversary

Grants.gov, the single Web site unifying federal grants, marked its first year of operations as one of the more successful of 25 Quicksilver e-government projects. Grants.gov lets applicants find and apply for federal grants online at one site.

“In just 12 months, site usage has grown significantly to more than five million page
views each month, and the momentum continues," HHS secretary Tommy Thompson said. Grants.gov, a collaborative effort led by the Health and Human Services Department, is one of 25 e-government initiatives under the governance of the
Office of Management and Budget. It is one of only two e-gov initiatives to meet OMB operational goals this year.

With Grants.gov, state, local and tribal governments, colleges and universities, non-profits, research institutions and other organizations can access, find and apply for grants from more than 900 programs representing more than $360 billion in annual grant funds offered by the 26 grant-making agencies. See GCN Story.

"General awareness is building due to marketing efforts and word-of-mouth buzz in the grant community,” said Rebecca Spitzgo, Grants.gov program manager. The site lists all federal grant notices, while 60 percent of grantor agencies are now able to post application packages and accept grant applications electronically.

User satisfaction with Grants.gov's comprehensive listings and simplicity of
use is leading to repeat site visits and pass-along endorsements, Spitzgo said.
For example, Jane Lopez, research administrator for the Virginia
Institute of Marine Science, called it “grants submission for dummies."

Among its accomplishments, Grants.gov has:

  • received 1,200 electronic grant applications

  • enrolled 3,000 grant-seeking organizations to apply online

  • posted 1,400 grant opportunity notices

  • e-mailed 600,000 grant opportunity notices to interested parties weekly.



About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.