A desktop for ultralights

Who put the "lap" in "laptop" anyway? Sure, you can use a laptop, or notebook, computer on your lap, but it's not always comfortable or practical. That's where the Laptop Desk UltraLite from Lapworks comes in.

The product provides a sturdy work surface for your lap that actually cools the notebook to prevent uncomfortable levels of heat from reaching your legs. This is possible thanks to ventilation channels on the Laptop Desk UltraLite that allow increased airflow beneath the computer.

As the name implies, this model is designed specifically for ultralight and thin notebook computers weighing 5 pounds or less. It's thinner and lighter than the company's Laptop Desk, which is designed for full-size notebook computers, making it a good travel companion for the ultralights.

An added bonus is the relatively large mouse area on both sides of the symmetrical Laptop Desk, which also could be used to hold a notepad or other small items.

The Laptop Desk isn't just for laps; it's also for desks. The innovative design folds in half and can be propped open at five angles for more ergonomic typing and viewing. Sturdy rubber pads grip the notebook so it doesn't slide off.

When opened flat, the Laptop Desk UltraLite measures 11 x 22 inches. For travel, it folds flat to measure 11 x 11 inches, with a thickness of 5/16 of an inch.

The product is currently available at www.laptopdesk.net for an introductory offer of $19.95 after a $10 instant rebate. Later this year, it will retail for $29.95 under the Targus brand.

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