Ronen to depart ACT/IAC

Industry sources confirmed that Joiwind Ronen has resigned as executive director of the American Council on Technology and the Industry Advisory Council. The sources said she informed board members of the two organizations in a conference call on Wednesday evening. A formal announcement is expected by Thursday evening.

During the call, Ronen said she wanted to leave to spend time on other causes about which she is passionate. Board members are expected to initiate a search for her replacement immediately.

Ronen had been executive director since May 2003. From the beginning of her tenure, Ronen sought to expand ACT programs and to reposition the two councils.

At the time, ACT was known as the Federation of Government Information Processing Councils, with membership drawn primarily from government, academia and nonprofit groups. In 1989, ACT created IAC, whose members come from industry, to improve communications between the public and private sectors.

An uneasy truce has existed between the organizations since the mid-1990s when the two organizations battled for dominance. Ronen's agenda was to put ACT in the lead position. But industry participants emphasized that the majority of membership dues that funded the organizations came from the industry side.

About the Author

Connect with the FCW staff on Twitter @FCWnow.

Featured

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    OPM nominee plans focus on telework, IT, retirement

    Kiran Ahuja, a veteran of the Office of Personnel Management, told lawmakers that she thinks that the lack of consistent leadership in the top position at OPM has taken a toll on the ability of the agency to complete longer term IT modernization projects.

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

Stay Connected