ESRI wins geospatial work

Geodata.gov

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Interior Department officials have chosen ESRI to update Geodata.gov, an online tool that combines thousands of geospatial resources from federal, state, local, tribal and private sources. The Web portal is part of Geospatial One-Stop, one of the federal government's 24 original e-government initiatives.

The site allows government officials at all levels to get quick access to maps and other data that can be used to aid in making on-the-spot emergency response decisions, for example.

ESRI was hired to create an updated version of the existing site. The value of the contract could reach $2.38 million over five years if all of the options are exercised.

"Geodata.gov serves as a critical information resource during emergencies," said Lynn Scarlett, assistant secretary of the Interior for policy, management and budget. "In the fall, for example, Geodata.gov served as a one-stop source for crucial information for state and local officials while multiple hurricanes pummeled the Southeast."

Combining Geodata.gov with the additional resources of the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS decision makers "can do everything from viewing a real-time weather map of the United States to using stream-gauging tools to assess which streams are approaching flood stage, to locating sources of emergency help," said Karen Siderelis, U.S. Geological Survey associate director for geospatial information.

The Web portal also aids in long-term collaboration for transportation planning, social services, regional planning and environmental protection.

In developing the new version of the site, ESRI personnel will:

Make it easier for users lacking technological expertise to use the site.

Incorporate new search capabilities.

Expand interoperability to facilitate information sharing from multiple sources.

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