Justice funds XML pilots

Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative

Six states will receive Justice Department funding for pilot projects aimed at improving their information-sharing systems.

The National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices announced last week that the states -- Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin -- will each get $50,000 grants to adopt the Global Justice Extensible Markup Language (XML) Data Model to exchange information.

For example, Kentucky officials have proposed electronically transmitting fingerprint data collected at the time of booking to the prosecutor's case management system. Wisconsin will give law enforcement officials timely access to probation and parole conditions.

Justice's program is a four-year effort to lay the foundation for local, state, tribal and federal interoperability by providing an XML-based framework for information sharing among law enforcement and public safety agencies, prosecutors, public defenders and court systems. Since the program's creation, more than 50 law enforcement and justice-related projects have been implemented using the XML model.

The states will participate in a yearlong implementation process that will include NGA-sponsored site visits, two police academy meetings and customized technical assistance. The projects will be closely monitored and documented to help other states and localities implement similar projects.

Featured

  • Comment
    Diverse Workforce (Image: Shutterstock)

    Who cares if you wear a hoodie or a suit? It’s the mission that matters most

    Responding to Steve Kelman's recent blog post, Alan Thomas shares the inside story on 18F's evolution.

  • Cybersecurity
    enterprise security (Omelchenko/Shutterstock.com)

    Does Einstein need a post-SolarWinds makeover?

    A marquee program designed to protect the government against cybersecurity threats is facing new scrutiny in the wake of Solar Winds Orion breach, but analysts say the program was unlikely to have ever stopped the hacking campaign.

Stay Connected