DHS seeks airborne lookout

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Homeland Security Department officials are seeking information about alternatives and design concepts for a border surveillance and detection system.

The department issued a request for information for an Airborne Border Incursion Detection System to detect, identify and track all incursions attempting to illegally gain access via ground and air routes at the southern border, according to a Mar. 18 notice posted on the FedBizOpps Web site.

The system should provide:

• Minimum surveillance coverage of 300 miles by 5 miles.

• Autonomous search capability.

• Detection, tracking and identification of illegal incursions by ground vehicles and aircraft.

• Detection in all terrain types, including desert, mountain, heavy foliage, rivers and lakes.

• Operation in all weather and cloud cover conditions.

• 36 hours of uninterrupted operations while providing coverage 24 hours a day.

• Compliance with all Federal Aviation Administration operating requirements.

According to the notice, interested private-sector companies must submit sufficient written design concepts, performance and cost information for such a system by 3 p.m. May 2 to the Customs and Border Protection agency.

“Technical information should include a description of the system concept, weight, range, speed, operating range/altitude, payload (weight, size and performance), sensor capability, support systems, operating and maintenance facility requirements, personnel requirements, communications and any performance limitations,” according to the notice.

For more information, visit the FedBizOpps site at www.fedbizopps.gov.

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