Telelogic acquires Popkin

Two tools familiar to integrators engaged in enterprise architecture and software development will soon exist under one roof.

Telelogic on April 18 announced plans to acquire Popkin Software. That deal, expected to close May 1, would unite Telelogic's DOORS requirements management tool with Popkin's System Architect enterprise architecture offering.

The Sweden-based Telelogic will pay $45 million in cash for Popkin. Popkin, a privately held company, has 2004 revenue of $19.1 million.

Telelogic partners with such integrators as Accenture, Northrop Grumman, and Science Applications International Corp. Popkin's integrator allies include CGI, Computer Sciences Corp., and Perot Systems.

Jan Popkin, founder and chief executive officer of Popkin, said DOORS and System Architect are frequently used together in the federal market, citing the Homeland Security Department as an example. Government integrators using those products now will have "a stronger support base and a more integrated R&D base," Popkin said.

Ingemar Ljungdahl, Telelogic's chief technology officer, said the addition of Popkin extends the company's software development toolkit into modeling and business process modeling for the Defense Department's Architecture Framework, which provides a standard architectural method to promote interoperability among systems.

Under the Telelogic umbrella, the Telelogic and Popkin organizations will initially be maintained "as is," said Scott Raskin, president of Telelogic Americas and Asia/Pacific. The organizational structure will be "enhanced" over time, he added.

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