Forman leaves Cassatt

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"Forman's legacy"

Longtime information technology policy leader Mark Forman will return to the Washington, D.C. area in early June.

Forman left his position as executive vice president of Cassatt, a Silicon Valley grid-computing start-up company, the first week of May. Before joining Cassatt in 2003, Forman was the first Office of Management and Budget administrator for e-government and information technology.

Forman said he left Cassatt "for personal reasons, to pursue other opportunities, and to spend more time with my family."

Details on his new position will be forthcoming shortly, he added. It involves "returning to my longstanding focus on government reform," he said. Forman has previously also served as the senior professional staff member on the majority staff of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee.

Forman is due to moderate a panel at the Management of Change conference later this month. The panel will focus on describing how companies could succeed with bid proposals to the federal government that rely on emerging IT technologies. "A lot of people in industry don't want to bid current technologies because they don't think they’ll win," Forman said, pointing to US-VISIT, the program that screens foreigners entering and exiting the country. "One of my big pushes is, the government is the biggest spender in IT, we ought to be able to get the best technical approaches [but] industry doesn't know how to bid it."

About the Author

David Perera is a special contributor to Defense Systems.

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