E-government could be a new academic field

ATLANTA—The scientific study of how government uses technology to interact with citizens is not a full-fledged discipline yet, though the building blocks are in place for it to become one, according to a panel at the National Science Foundation’s annual meeting for researchers in its Digital Government program.

“Governments are spending billions of dollars on systems without understanding what they are buying or how they fit in their organizations,” said Jane Fountain, director of the National Center for Digital Government at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

The nascent field still faces considerable barriers to recognition as a full-fledged discipline. One is the lack of basic theoretical research, said Judith Klavans, director of research for the University of Maryland’s Center of Advanced Study of Language. Most projects funded by federal agencies or states have been aimed at addressing specific problems, rather than building the basic knowledge of the field.

About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.

Featured

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

  • Cybersecurity
    Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lora Ratliff)

    Mayorkas announces cyber 'sprints' on ransomware, ICS, workforce

    The Homeland Security secretary announced a series of focused efforts to address issues around ransomware, critical infrastructure and the agency's workforce that will all be launched in the coming weeks.

Stay Connected