Forrester study finds slowing e-gov adoption

The Presidential e-Government Initiatives of 2000 have lost much of their steam because people still prefer to interact with federal agencies over the telephone, according to a report from Forrester Research Inc. of Cambridge, Mass.

“Our research indicates that citizens contact the government predominantly for personal rather than business reasons, seeking answers to specific questions, expressing opinions or completing transactions,” said Alan Webber, a consulting analyst.

“Because of the personal nature of these interactions, they still rely on telephone and in-person contact and don’t completely trust the Web. Even though most of these people use the Internet for other aspects of their daily lives, old habits die hard,” Webber said in a press release.

Hurdles for implementation of e-government initiatives include constrained budgets and a change-resistant culture, which may become exacerbated as federal IT spending begins to decrease in the next couple of years, the report said. Government bureaucracy, extremely long project cycles and long overdue deadlines also have slowed adoption.

Forrester defined three levels of e-government maturity: an “access era” to obtain information online; an “interaction era” to make small transactions and submit information online; and an “engagement era” to complete personalized, comprehensive transactions online. Most agencies currently are at the interaction era.

Moving forward will require more disciplined management practices, an increase in the security of online environments, more complete enterprise architectures, greater capabilities for records and data, and additional IT talent, according to the study.

Alice Lipowicz is a writer for Government Computer News’ sister publication, Washington Technology.

About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.

Featured

  • Budget
    Stock photo ID: 134176955 By Richard Cavalleri

    House passes stopgap spending bill

    The current appropriations bills are set to expire on Oct. 1; the bill now goes to the Senate where it is expected to pass.

  • Defense
    concept image of radio communication (DARPA)

    What to look for in DOD's coming spectrum strategy

    Interoperability, integration and JADC2 are likely to figure into an updated electromagnetic spectrum strategy expected soon from the Department of Defense.

Stay Connected