IRS search for public records access ends with ChoicePoint

The Internal Revenue Service has awarded ChoicePoint Government Services a contract worth as much as $20 million to serve as the agency's public records provider for batch processing projects, according to the company.

Under a five-year contract, ChoicePoint will provide the IRS with access to its suite of custom data solutions. IRS officials will use ChoicePoint’s public records data capabilities to support customized data retrieval requirements.

ChoicePoint provides public records information about a person, asset or location, a company spokesperson said. The information can include current and former addresses, property ownership records and bankruptcy, lien or judgment information.

These searches can be performed one at time or in bulk, which are known as batch searches. The IRS contract is for batch searches, the spokesperson said.

“This award is consistent with our Government Services strategy of helping clients manage unique challenges by using ChoicePoint’s customized data delivery capabilities,” said Rob Russell, ChoicePoint Government Services assistant vice president for strategic development, based in Washington.

Batch processing involves the automated delivery and processing of data files, which reduces the need for human intervention. More than 25 federal agencies use ChoicePoint batch solutions to support their daily activities, company officials said.

ChoicePoint Government Solutions is a division of ChoicePoint Inc. of Atlanta.

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Government Computer News’ sister publication, Washington Technology.

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