Fox to leave GSA

Neal Fox, assistant commissioner of the Office of Commercial Acquisition at the General Services Administration, is leaving the agency.

In a brief e-mail, Fox said that he plans to leave GSA in the near future, but did not specify the date.

"It has been fun, but after nearly 30 years of public service, 26 1/2 active duty military and three years at GSA, that seems like plenty," Fox said in the message. "There is something to be said for going out while you are on the top of your game. I am already a retired Air Force colonel, so this is not a retirement. I will be moving into the private sector."

Fox joined GSA in 2002. Larry Allen, executive vice president of the Coalition for Government Procurement, said Fox had been accessible and open to industry concerns.

"The Coalition has worked closely with Neal since he arrived at GSA and we appreciate his efforts to work with industry to streamline and modernize the procurement process," Allen said in a written statement.

In his tenure at the agency, Fox introduced and championed electronic commerce technologies. More recently, he proposed consolidating the 43 GSA schedule contracts into a smaller number of contracts or possibly even a single one.

Fox did not disclose who his next employer would be.

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