AT&T Networx head ready to go

CHICAGO -- Henry Beebe left the Defense Information Systems Agency to take the reins of the Networx contract at AT&T Government Solutions in June.

For some people, wading into such a major endeavor so late in the game and going up against counterparts at other companies who have been waist-deep in Networx issues for two years might be intimidating. But Beebe said he finds it invigorating.

Not only is it not a disadvantage, he said, "I think it might be an advantage. I mean that a little bit tongue-in-cheek, but sometimes fresh eyes help."

Beebe had worked at AT&T from 2002 to 2004, following 21 years at integrator TRW, before going to DISA. He came back to replace Bob Collet as chief engineer and leader of the Networx capture team, drawn by the opportunity.

The next several years will be tumultuous as the companies that finally get the Networx contract help agencies make the transition from their current contracts to the new one. But even after that frenzy fades, Beebe said he doesn't expect calm seas.

"New services will be added that we haven't even though of yet," he said.

And many agencies are currently not using General Services Administration contracts at all for network services and telecommunications needs, he said. Persuading them to move to Networx "is a tremendous opportunity for GSA and for those [companies] that serve GSA."

Beebe was attending the GSA Network Services conference in Chicago.

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