Majority of states have adopted enterprise architecture

NASCIO report: “The States and Enterprise Architecture”

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An overwhelming number of states are using or planning to adopt an enterprise architecture approach to transform their government operations, according to a new report released by the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO).

The survey states that 95 percent of respondents are using or planning to use enterprise architecture, while 92 percent said it was necessary to have a defined process for it. Another 71 percent said states needed a dedicated staff for such programs.

Thirty-seven states and Washington, D.C., participated in the survey conducted in August. The survey was done to assess the level of adoption at a point in time and gauge the awareness and effectiveness of NASCIO’s enterprise architecture products. However, the report offered several other observations.

• Most EA programs focus on technology architecture.

• A few states are broadening such programs to include business architecture, performance management and process architecture.

• NASCIO needs to better emphasize use of programs in business, process, information and security architectural areas.

• The association needs to better market such processes and tools.

Among several recommendations, the report states that NASCIO should seek additional funding from other federal agencies, foundations and corporate partners besides the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The bureau has provided most of the funds to NASCIO to develop its enterprise architecture toolkit.

“Given the importance of advancing the federal enterprise architecture, it would be sensible for federal agencies to fund [enterprise architecture] efforts at the state and local level,” the report states. “To ensure alignment on national initiatives and effective program implementation, a broader understanding of [enterprise architecture] is required at the state and local level. A more diversified federal funding stream would enable NASCIO to emphasize more government lines of business.”

One benefit, the report states, would be developing a national capability for information sharing and interoperability.

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