Army office picks IBM for services

The Army's Office of the Judge Advocate General has chosen IBM to provide technical support and project management services, according to an IBM announcement. The firm will work on projects intended to improve delivery of legal services, expand computing capacity and reduce overall costs.

The contract, worth up to $7.4 million over five years, came under the Army’s Information Technology Enterprise Solutions-Enterprise Mission Support Service Solutions contract.

The JAG Corps provides legal services for active and retired military personnel and their families. It also provides prosecutors and defense attorneys for criminal trials conducted under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

The contract calls on IBM's federal consulting unit to revamp JAG's IT suite. The firm will integrate existing systems, develop new applications and improve network performance. Another firm, Ciber, will provide project management and software maintenance services alongside IBM.

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