Louisiana tests readiness for hurricanes

With the destruction caused last year by hurricanes Katrina and Rita still fresh in everyone’s mind, Louisiana has been testing its preparedness plans for the upcoming hurricane season, including the readiness of interoperable communications.

The communication tests were to be included as part of simulations and tests May 23-24, conducted under the Louisiana Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Functional Exercise/Communications Full Scale Exercise.

The state conducted the two-day exercise under what it calls a “no-fault” atmosphere, which was intended to expose any flaws in current plans and to establish a learning environment that federal, state, local and private entities could use to exercise their emergency protocols and open lines of communication for identifying improvements.

The exercise was intended to simulate the closely related tasks that comprise the pre-landfall and post-landfall initial response to a hurricane required by state, city and regional officials.

The exercise was to include full-scale role playing by people representing residents that needed to be processed through the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center and the Union Passenger Terminal in New Orleans, while testing communications needed to deal with the city’s special needs and elderly population.

The East Baton Rouge Parish EOC was to use an evacuation of the Renaissance Village Trailer park, one of several federal facilities that still houses people displaced by Katrina, as the focal point for its segment of the exercise, during which the parish expected to validate its tactical interoperable communication plan needed for a forthcoming Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI).

The UASI is a federal Department of Homeland Security program aimed at improving emergency response throughout the United States.

About the Author

Brian Robinson is a freelance writer based in Portland, Ore.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.