Bond to head ITAA

The Information Technology Association of America’s board of directors has chosen Phillip Bond to be the association’s president and chief executive officer.

The selection of the Monster Worldwide executive and former undersecretary for technology at the Commerce Department caps a process that began with Harris Miller’s resignation as ITAA president in January. Miller resigned to run for the Senate on Virginia’s Democratic ticket, but he lost to James Webb in last week’s primary.

Robert Laurence, an executive at Sybase and a past ITAA chairman and board member, will continue serving as the association’s interim president until Bond takes over in August.

Bond worked as undersecretary of Commerce for technology from 2001 to 2005 and as chief of staff to Commerce Secretary Donald Evans from 2002 to 2003. As undersecretary, he oversaw the operations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of Technology Policy and the National Technical Information Service.

He also played a big role in cybersecurity planning and policy. In 2003, Scientific American magazine named him one of the top 50 contributors to technology in the United States for promoting nanotechnology in the federal government.

Bond served as director of federal public policy at Hewlett-Packard in 2001 and senior vice president for government affairs and treasurer of the IT Industry Council from 1998 to 2001. From 1993 to 1998, he was chief of staff to Rep. Jennifer Dunn (R-Wash.), and from 1992 to 1993 he was principal deputy assistant secretary at the Defense Department, guiding legislative affairs for then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney.

Bond is a 1978 cum laude graduate of Linfield College in McMinnville, Ore.

“This is a critical time for the industry,” said Dave Sanders, chairman of the ITAA board, in a statement announcing Bond’s selection. “From [research and development] and workforce to government procurement and homeland security, there is a basket of technology policy issues that need efficient and effective legislative action.”

Bond “will help give our industry the momentum it needs for substantial progress across a range of issues,” Sanders said.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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