RFID tag-testing software expands worldwide

FDA considers using RFID or bar codes to track medical devices

Odin Technologies, a provider of radio frequency identification software, announced that its EasyTag product, which works in all UHF ranges, is now available in international markets.

RFID tags track a wide variety of consumer products from their manufacture to their appearance on store shelves, which improves security and inventory accounting.

In June, the Food and Drug Administration announced plans to require drug manufacturers to use RFID tags by the end of 2007 to establish an electronic pedigree for medications and thereby prevent counterfeiting.

Odin Technologies said in a statement that EasyTag allows users to measure tags’ performance based on their locations on products, which helps them choose the appropriate tag and location for their tracking needs. That approach ensures 100 percent accuracy in tag reading, the company said.

Until now, companies in Europe, Japan and other overseas markets have been unable to conduct scientific testing of tagged products, said Kevin MacDonald, Odin Technologies’ vice president of client architecture.

“EasyTag allows people for the first time to test for their local frequency requirements from 860 to 960 MHz,” replacing trial-and-error methods, he said.

Based in Dulles, Va., Odin Technologies publishes the RFID Benchmark Series, an industry reference on RFID tags and performance analysis of readers.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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