IG gives GSA support centers a clean bill of health

The General Services Administration's regional Client Support Centers (CSCs) have greatly improved since GSA launched a program called “Get It Right” in 2004, according to a Sept. 29 GSA Inspector General report.

“The CSCs have implemented the national controls identified in the previous administrator’s ‘Get it Right’ plan, and overall contracting practices have improved considerably compared to our past audits,” the IG audit states.

GSA’s 11 regional CSCs — found to be noncompliant with regulations in a June 14, 2005, audit — now are complying with Federal Acquisition Service regulations and Defense Department guidelines.

Although the IG found minor problems, they were isolated cases and not pervasive, according to the audit. For example, the Mid-Atlantic CSC paid $16,000 for business class airfare for two people when the IG estimated the cost should have been about $4,500.

DOD customers represent more than 82 percent of the CSCs’ business, according to the audit. The fiscal 2005 Defense Authorization bill mandated that DOD and GSA IGs review each center to determine its compliance with regulations.

GSA's business through centers slipped sharply in fiscal 2005, to $3.6 billion from $5.4 billion the year before.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.