SI adds FBI, NSA veteran to board

SI International, an information technology and network solutions company, has added Maureen Baginski to the company’s board of directors.

The board now totals 11 members, eight of whom are independent directors.

Baginski has almost three decades of service in the intelligence community, according to an SI statement.

From 2003 to 2005, she was the FBI’s executive assistant director for intelligence, where she established and managed the FBI’s first intelligence program. Her mission was to adapt FBI intelligence capabilities with information technologies to create an intelligence-sharing operation that could identify threats before they became attacks.

From 1979 to 2003, she worked at the National Security Agency in a variety of positions, including Signals Intelligence director, Senior Operations Office in the National Security Operations Center. As such, Baginski established and directed a unified program to exploit encrypted or denied information on global networks.

“Baginski brings to SI International a wealth of experience and demonstrated successes in the intelligence community,” said Ray Oleson, executive chairman of the board. “She will provide great insight towards our focus area of homeland defense.”

Baginski is the recipient of two Presidential Rank Awards, two Director of Central Intelligence National Achievement Medals, the Director of Military Intelligence’s Leadership Award and NSA’s Exceptional Civilian Service Award.

She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Slavic languages and linguistics from the State University of New York at Albany.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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