China approves Savi RFID tags

The Chinese government has officially certified Savi Technology’s family of radio frequency identification devices, the company announced. The ruling will allow Savi to use its RFID tags, readers and signposts throughout the world’s largest manufacturing country.

China’s State Radio Regulation Committee, a division of the Ministry of Information Industry, granted the approval. It applies to active RFID technology that meets the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO) 18000-7 standard, which operates at the 433 MHz frequency.

The certification “further validates international recognition that active RFID technology standard ISO 18000-7 is the global standard,” said Fraser Jennings, Savi’s vice president for standards and regulatory affairs, in a statement.

Australia, Korea, Taiwan and the municipality of Hong Kong have granted similar approvals to Savi, showing “solid support for the 433 MHz frequency as the worldwide choice for active RFID,” Jennings said.

But the European Commission’s Radio Spectrum Committee endorsed the use of the 865 to 868 MHz frequency band, according to reports. Standardizing on that band will result in the use of tags that are less expensive and can be read more quickly over greater distances, a commission paper states.

Domestically, the Virginia Port Authority recently tapped Savi Networks to deploy an RFID-based system that aims to boost the security of cargo container shipments.

Savi is a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

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